Header Graphic
 
 
 
 St Helens
Rarity Photos
 
 
 Night Heron
Night Heron
Carr Mill Dam
 22nd May 2016
© Derek Williams
 
 
female Black Redstart
Black Redstart
female
Brookfield St
Earlestown, NLW
17th February 2015
     Little Egret
Little Egret
Arches
Carr Mill Dam
© Derek Williams 

Ring-necked Duck
Ring-necked Duck
Newton Lake
7th April 2014

Ring-necked Duck
Ring-necked Duck
Newton Lake
7th April 2014
 

Ring necked duck
Ring-necked Duck
Newton Lake
7th April 2014

© Steve Bond

 
American Black Tern
American
Black Tern 

Eccleston Mere

© Colin Davies

 
Adult Summer Med Gull
Med Gull
 Newton Lake, NLW 
 
Arctic Tern
Arctic Tern

Eccleston Mere

© Paul Brady

 

male Pied Flycatcher 
Pied Flycatcher
male
T
aylor Park
© Damian Pendlebury
 
 
Waxwing
Waxwing
Andover Road
Haydock
 
Bittern at Carr Mill 
Bittern
Carr Mill Dam
© Dennis Eagling 
 
Bittern at Carr Mill 
Bittern
Carr Mill Dam
© Dennis Eagling 
 
Bittern at Carr Mill 
Bittern
Carr Mill Dam
© Dennis Eagling 
 

Juv Arctic Tern
Juv Arctic Tern

Eccleston Mere

 
 
Waxwing 
Waxwing

Napier Close
Town Centre

© Paul Brady

 
 
Ring Ouzel 
  Ring Ouzel

Billinge Hill

 
   
 
 
Go to the
Photo Galleries 
  to see more photos
 
 

  


Reeds Moss Site Guide

 This site guide reproduced with permission from the St Helens Wildlife Recording Group


Location

Reed’s Moss is the triangle of farmland bordered by the Rainford bypass (A570), East Lancs road (A580) and Blindfoot Lane (B5203).


Access

Access is limited, but there are a few footpaths over the moss, notably at Reed’s Lane, adjacent to the Bottle and Glass pub, just off the Rainford bypass, and also in the southern section along Moss Lane, adjacent to Liverpool St. Helens Rugby ground.


Birds

Breeding species

A number of farmland species that are nationally in serious decline still breed on the moss in good numbers. The most obvious species are Skylark and Lapwing, and their song fills the air on any spring morning. Corn Buntings, Yellowhammers, Little Owl and Tree Sparrows breed in small numbers, and declining Grey Partridge can be seen with the released Red-legged Partridge.
The site holds locally important numbers of Yellow Wagtails, with at least four pairs making it the best breeding site in St. Helens for the species. It is the only known site for breeding Snipe in the borough, with around seven males drumming in spring. One to three pairs of Oystercatchers breed, and a few Woodcock are seen roding in spring and early summer. The latter species is best seen at Reed’s Lane, and on warm summer evenings it is possible to sit outside the Bottle and Glass, and watch the birds roding over the pub.
Common breeding species include Linnet and Whitethroat. In total 51 species are thought to breed on the moss.


Winter visitors

Up to 3000 Pink-footed Geese have used the moss in recent winters, and in January 2001 they were accompanied by a single European White-fronted Goose. Raptors are at their most numerous at this time of year, and this is one of the most important sites in St. Helens for them (see below), especially Merlin and Hen Harrier. Flocks of finches, thrushes and Lapwings use the moss, as do a pair of Ravens (which bred in St.Helens town centre for the first time in 2001).

Migrants

Regular migrants include White Wagtails, Wheatears, Yellow Wagtails, Oystercatchers, Golden Plover and Curlew and rarer migrants have included Montagu’s Harrier (see below) and Tree Pipit. Unconfirmed sightings have been of Red Kite and Red-legged Falcon.

Raptors

The area is particularly favoured by raptors and they deserve a special mention. Up to five Buzzards can be seen regularly over the moss and they have been seen displaying over woodland (only one or two pairs breed annually in St. Helens). Kestrels and Sparrowhawks are a common sight and Hen Harriers, Merlin and Peregrine are annual winter visitors. In 2000 a Montagu’s Harrier was seen on the moss (Lancashire Bird Report 2000). This was only the second record for St. Helens and the 21st for Lancashire / North Merseyside.


Ot
her wildlife

The moss is under recorded when it comes to wildlife other than birds, but a moth survey was planned for 2002.
Butterflies tend to be of the migrant kind, with good numbers of Red Admirals, a few Painted Ladies, and once a Clouded Yellow (less than 10 records ever in St. Helens).
Brown Hares are quite common on the moss.
 



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 Selection of Photos from
the
Photo Galleries

 

Red-crested Pochard, male
Red-crested Pochard, male
Eccleston Mere
13th February 2017
© Colin Davies
 

Dunlin
Dunlin
Carr Mill Dam
© Derek Williams

Peregrine
Peregrine male
on roof top opposite
my house
14th July 2015

Kingfisher
Kingfisher
Sankey Valley
© Steve Bond

Redpoll
Redpoll

Wagon Lane 
Sankey Valley

Nuthatch
Nuthatch
Stanley Bank
Sankey Valley

male Sparrowhawk
Sparrowhawk
male
my back garden

Great Spotted Woodpecker
 Great Spotted Woodpecker
Sankey Valley
Visitor Centre
 

 Male & Female Mandarin Ducks
2m-2f Mandarins
Linkway Retail
Park Ponds

 Little Grebe
Little Grebe

 

 The Dream HDR computer effect 
The Dream
HDR image


Avocet
Avocet
Marshside NR RSPB

 Dipper
 Dipper 
nr Carmarthen
Wales

Wood Sandpiper
 Wood Sandpiper
Pennington Flash

Shag
Shag
Farne Islands

Med Gull
 Med Gull 
Great Yarmouth Beach

Billinge Hill  

Billinge Hill

Rainford

Nine Arches, NLW
Nine Arches
Newton le Willows
 

Comma Butterfly
Comma Butterfly

Peacock feather
Peacock feather 

 

Go to the
Photo Galleries
to see more photos

www.000webhost.com